Best Organic Kids Mattress

Kids breathe and absorb toxic chemicals on an ordinary mattress!

A kids mattress SHOULD be nontoxic. Conventional mattresses are made from an array of petrochemicals, synthetic materials and chemical additives (flame retardant chemicals, mercury, boric acid, and formaldehyde).  Kids spend a lot of time on their mattresses especially when they are very young.  Sleep is important for healthy development, not to mention their mood. Do you spend the extra time to provide your kids with healthy food to put in their bodies?  Don’t you want your kids to spend the time that is supposed to rejuventate their minds and bodies in a clean, nontoxic environment?

The Shasta – Best Organic Kids Mattress

ShastaKOw_bed1000

Lifekind’s Hand-Tufted Natural Rubber certified organic twin mattress (The Shasta) is the best organic mattress for kids.  It is our most budget-friendly natural rubber latex organic mattress.

Fire Protection Done Wrong 

Conventional mattresses are drenched in toxic chemical flame retardants.  Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used in conventional mattresses to lower the risk and slow the spread of fire.  How many kids do you know who are smoking a cigar when they go to bed?   When kids sleep at night, they breathe in the PBDEs that offgas from the mattress. 2010 study found that “children with higher concentrations of PBDE congeners in their umbilical cord blood at birth scored lower on tests of mental and physical development between the ages of one and six. Developmental effects were particularly evident at four years of age, when verbal and full IQ scores were reduced 5.5 to 8.0 points for those with the highest prenatal exposures.”  There is a ton of information on the internet about the risks of exposer to PBDEs, so why not avoid the risk altogether?  

Other flame-retardant chemicals currently approved for use in mattresses include:

Antimony, a metal that may be more toxic than mercury
Boric acid, a toxic respiratory irritant used as an insecticide
Formaldehyde, which has been classified as a known human carcinogen

Fire Protection Done Right 

My favorite thing about Lifekind certified organic mattresses (that’s a mouthful!) is the absence of chemical flame retardants.  Not only are their organic mattresses made completely from certified organic materials, but they aren’t dipped in chemical flame retardants.  A lot of companies that, claim to be organic use kevlar as their flame retardant. Kevlar is a petrochemical material used in bullet-proof vests. Not Lifekind – we just use naturally safer Wool!  The Shasta organic kids mattress has passed the same flame retardant tests that chemical laden mattresses pass, so you are not risking any fire danger by choosing the organic option.  The secret? The Naturally Safer® pure wool under the cover is packed tightly.  I know, it seems so simple.

Lifekind’s Organic Mattress Factory’s Burn Test – OMI

Organic Certifications

GOLSThis organic kids mattress is filled with GOLS certified organic latex rubber and has layers of Naturally Safer® pure wool beneath the certified organic cotton surface of the mattress to create natural flame protection.  

 

GREENGUARD_Gold_RGB_GreenLifekind’s organic kids Shasta mattress is Greenguard Certified, which means that it has extremely low chemical emissions.  Why is that important?  It lets you know that you can trust Lifekind’s claim that this product is safe, that a third party has tested it.  Your child will be sleeping in a high-quality, nontoxic, organic natural mattress.  Reducing your child’s exposer to harmful chemicals at night.

 

gots-logo_cmyk_epsKOLifekind’s factory, located in Northern California, is the first and only large-scale 100%-organic mattress Eco-Factory™ in North America. Oregon Tilth has certified our entire facility to the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). That means that every product that is made in this factory is organic.

 Provide your child with safe and healthy sleep.

DanielwithFlag

This is my son, Daniel, on a Lifekind organic mattress. Made in America!

Here are some of the features of the Shasta that make it such a great organic option for children:

•  Filled with 6” of pure shredded natural organic rubber

•  Layers of Naturally Safer® pure wool beneath the surface of the certified organic cotton cover, which provide extra cushioning and natural flammability protection

•  Medium-firm feel

•  Mold-, mildew-, and dust-mite resistant (reduces allergy exposure)

•  Metal-free

•  Available in twin and twin extra-long only

•  Depth: Approximately 7”

•  Handmade in the USA

•  90-Day Comfort Exchange

•  20-year limited warranty

Can you reduce your child’s chemical exposure at night while a chemical mattress is still in their bedroom?

An Organic Barrier Cover can help reduce your childs exposure to dust mites, but not to toxic outgassing.  You should not purchase a plastic cover because it will offgas on its own.

Use a HEPA filter to clean the air

Vacuum your child’s room option

Use a wet cloth to remove dust

Use organic pillows

 Lifekind’s other Organic Options

Lifekind also has several other organic mattress choices for kids that also ship free the month of May 2014.  My 3 boys spent their early years on a Lifekind Organic Natural Rubber Crib Mattress, which I am now handing down to my little brother.  This organic mattress was built to last.  I used organic flannel and moisture pads on it and it still looks brand new, 9 years later.  I am glad that I reduced my children’s exposure to chemicals.

Sources:

Sleep Safe in a Toxic World

Organic Mattresses, Inc. passes CPSC flammability audit

Dr Mercola article – Is your mattress making you sick

http://www.achildgrows.com/organic-twin-matresses-what-to-look-for-and-where-to-find-them/

http://livewholebefree.com/wordpress/how-to-avoid-harmful-toxins-in-mattresses/

http://productguide.ulenvironment.com/ProductDetail.aspx?productID=20871

Greenguard.org

Prenatal Exposure to PBDEs and Neurodevelopment

GOLS certification

 

7 Mindful Shopping Practices

Twenty years ago organic food was not so popular, but I sought it out. People would ask me, a struggling single mother at the time, how I could afford organic groceries. The heart of my decision to shop organic was, and still is, the principle of it. I know I’m directly supporting the environmental movement every day, plain and simple.

Today organic groceries can be found in almost every grocery store in America. Healthier, organic food has become the norm for many, and there is more collective knowledge about what organic means.

 Screen shot 2014-03-04 at 11.44.53 AM

 

This message isn’t about healthy food. It’s about sustainable choices. We need to embrace change (yesterday!) and apply what we’ve learned about the food we eat to products we buy for everyday use. The chemicals used in conventional products and their manufacturing are just as dangerous as chemicals used in agriculture.

Observing the explosion of Whole Foods Market all over the map, it’s not hard to imagine a paradigm shift from “more for less” to “less is more.” Are you with me? Great! Read on for seven simple tips to help you keep your mind where your heart is while you’re shopping for everyday items.

1. Think quality, not quantity. Once you adopt a minimalist mentality, it is very difficult to go back. No more going to a dollar store for two items and ending up spending $20.

2. Support local. Read labels to find out where things are made. Unfortunately most items are made elsewhere, but it’s like striking gold when a surprise “Made in America” label is found. When you find products you love made in your region, state or country, latch on and don’t let go. Why not inform friends and neighbors, as well?

3. Disposables and planned obsolescence. Seek out longer lasting, recyclable, reusable or compostable alternatives to disposable or short-lived products you currently use, like diapers, razors, toothbrushes, feminine products, light bulbs, paper towels and napkins, paper plates, plasticware and cups, trash bags, sandwich & storage bags, and grocery bags. If you’re unsure where to find these alternatives, please leave a comment for us below.

 

DSC_0013

 

4.  Think about sources. What materials were used, using what chemicals in the process? For example, cotton fabric is made from soft plant fibers, so it’s perfect for textiles, but cotton is considered the world’s dirtiest crop involving tremendous amounts of pesticides, chemical treatments and water. Organic cotton is an excellent substitute, and as we continue buying more of it, more options will become available.

5.  Awaken your senses. Commercial household cleaning products and personal-care products are made with chemicals that are toxic to the people manufacturing them, the people using them, animals that come into contact with them, and the water systems where they end up. You can smell the pollution walking down the cleaning-products isle at conventional grocery stores. If it doesn’t smell like something from nature, don’t buy it. Tip: go to a health food store and sniff the pure essential oil samplers to get a better idea of what non-toxic scents from nature smell like.

6. Educate yourself and others. Tell people what you learn about consumerism, toxics, trash, and great alternatives. We have an opportunity to change the future for the better by educating children. To get my daughter to understand what clothes (something she has a genuine interest in) are made of, we made up a game I’ll call “animal, plant or other.” Her eyes lit up when she realized that the cotton shirt she was wearing was made from plant flowers. When I explained that rayon fabric is mostly made from wood pulp, she was like, “Whaaat?!” In a fun way, that forced her to think about material processes.

 

images

 

7. Take it in stride. Don’t go out and replace everything all at once. I suggest you take it as it comes, which will give you time to research better options. When you need new sheets, buy organic cotton sheets. When you need new razors and toothbrushes, buy Preserve recyclables. And on and on.

 

“Change is the only constant.” –Heraclitus

 

 

 

The Word On Washing

With cold and flu season well under way, most likely you are doubling up on the hand washing. And rightfully so – hand washing is definitely one of the best ways to stave off those nasty viruses. What you may not realize, however, is that too much washing may actually harm your health instead of helping.

According to an article posted yesterday by the Associated Press, the Food and Drug Administration is finally taking a closer look at the potential health problems linked to the chemicals commonly used in antibacterial soaps. After a 40-year delay, the FDA has been spurred to action by recent studies which suggest that hormone levels can be affected by triclosan and other similar chemicals.  It is estimated that nearly 75% of antibacterial liquid soaps and bodywashes contain triclosan.

Soap
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus arreus (MRSA). Infections caused by these “super bugs” are very painful and difficult to treat.

 

Killing the Good Bugs:

This news only adds to the skepticism that has long existed over the use of these chemical antibacterial agents. First of all, there is no way to target specific bacteria; helpful microbes are killed right along with the harmful ones. The “good bugs” provide a natural defense by preventing the pathogenic microbes from colonizing on our skin. Many people also question the value of exposing themselves to chemicals that have not even been proven to work more effectively than good old soap and water (this is a particular concern for those with chemical sensitivities). Furthermore, medical experts fear that over-use of antibacterial agents may be a contributing factor to the increase of drug-resistant bacteria. If you have ever seen someone dealing with a Methicillin-resistant Staph infection, you know that this is a serious matter!

 

What to Use Instead:

Even if you weed out the antibacterial soaps, you are still left with a lot of options that are less than ideal. For example, many soaps contain synthetic emollients (that’s a fancy word for moisturizer), such as petrolatum or mineral oil. While your skin may feel softer at first, over time these additives clog your pores and actually take moisture away from your skin. This is important because dry, cracked skin is vulnerable and less capable of keeping pathogens out.

Person Washing Hands with Soap in Washbasin

Your best bet is to use soaps with a natural emollient, such as glycerin. Soaps made with vegetable oils are much gentler on your skin – and more environmentally friendly – than those made with potassium tallowate (if the packaging does not say what it is made from, it’s probably the latter). Check out our Naturally Safer Liquid Soap and our Naturally Safer All-Vegetable Soap, which both smell amazing and do good things for your skin!

Lastly, remember that warm water works best. Very hot water can dry you out (especially if you soak long enough to get pruney) and cold water cannot dissolve as many germs and particles. You can read more about hand washing technique on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website. The CDC considers hand washing to be so important that they actually call it the “do-it-yourself-vaccine.”

So, keep washing and have a healthy holiday season!

The Best Mattresses For MCS

Many Lifekind customers are familiar with the term “MCS” because it stands for the medically controversial ailment multiple chemical sensitivities. People with MCS are usually sensitive to synthetic and/or scented products like hair spray, perfume, cleaning products, soaps and, of course, chemical mattresses.

Lifekind Organic Mattress

The effects of chemicals and pesticides on our health can be staggering, with some cases more extreme than others. I know this first hand, and am happy to say that it’s a good thing we live in a time when we have a choice and we’re changing the norm by purchasing non-chemical, organic products!

I first became aware of MCS after I’d been sleeping on a chemical mattress for a number of years, and throughout that time was experiencing numerous “mystery” health challenges. Honestly, I now attribute those health issues to long-term exposure to the chemicals in the mattress, since my health improved after I started sleeping on an organic mattress.

RawMaterialsPackage

When I speak to customers who are experiencing MCS symptoms, I’ll often suggest they try testing our organically certified mattress materials  before purchasing a mattress. The material samples are included with an allergy test sheet that provides specific instructions for sensitivity testing. One of Lifekind’s most popular mattress for sleepers with MCS is the Traditional Innerspring Mattress, which is made of certified organic cotton and certified organic wool.

AllergyTest Sheet

If you sense you may have MCS, a good resource is the Environmental Health Center in Dallas, TX, where Dr Ray and his staff have been helping people with multiple chemical sensitivities  since 1975. They have experience in diagnosing and treating more than 40,000 environmentally sensitive patients with their innovative techniques.

Even though MCS presents many health challenges and it’s not yet fully understood, I’m happy to be a part of the new thought revolution–one organic mattress, pillow or blanket at a time!

Good news for California!

gov_jerry_brown

In a move that’s sure to please anyone concerned about chemical exposure, California Governor Jerry Brown announced yesterday a new state flammability standard: As of Jan. 1, upholstered furniture sold in the state will be able to meet flammability requirements without the use of with PBDEs or other chemicals.

“Today, California is curbing toxic chemicals found in everything from high chairs to sofas,” said Governor Brown. “These new standards will keep the furniture in our homes fire-safe and limit unnecessary exposure to toxic flame retardants.”

The new rule overturns a controversial 1975 law that Brown himself signed during his first stint as governor: Technical Bulletin 117, which required furniture manufacturers to inject flame-retardant chemicals into the synthetic foam used in virtually all upholstered furniture in the state. That translated into 2-3 pounds for a typical sofa, but over the years research has increasingly shown that such chemicals pose a major threat of cancer and other health problems, with children being most at risk. When state agencies such as the Bureau of Home Furnishings – on whose advisory board Lifekind president and co-founder Walt Bader sits as a member – recommended the change, officials listened.

Now instead of foam that’s been infused with flame-retardant chemicals, upholstered products from recliners to infant swings and strollers will be made fire-safe by focusing on using cover materials that resist common sources of ignition such as cigarettes, space heaters, and extension cords. That, combined with fiber fillings that resist smoldering, will be enough to meet the new standard for most products, though it’s always important to hold retailers accountable: “While many manufacturers may elect to remove the chemicals, others may elect to leave them in due to concerns about liability,” said Judy Levin of the Center for Environmental Health. “So consumers will definitely have to be diligent and ask specific questions.”

Manufacturers may begin making products to the new standards on Jan. 1, 2014, and will have one year to be fully in compliance.

Let’s hope that other U.S. states follow California’s lead and that the trend goes worldwide to prevent chemical exposure for future generations!

If Textiles Could Talk: “Does that color come in organic?”

In a prior blog  I wrote about the unfortunate toxicity of conventional dyes and how the textile industry historically has a devastating effect on the environment and people’s health. As populations continue to grow and eco-awareness spreads, the clothing industry will need to find viable solutions to this problem.

People have been using “natural” dyes made from plant, mineral, and animal ingredients for thousands of years. In fact, dyed flax fibers, dating back 36,000 years, were found in a cave in the Republic of Georgia. Today, cultures around the world continue the craft of natural dyeing to produce uniquely colored yarns and cloths.

6285056260_397184b155

There is a huge variety of natural substances that can be used to color fabric. Having a broad chemical range, different substances require different techniques, and many require the use of a mordant. Mordants are metallic salts that bind the dye to the fabric, typically applied prior to submerging fabric into a dye bath. Many, but not all, traditionally used mordants are toxic, which presents the same problems as synthetic dyes: human exposure and wastewater disposal. Some popular natural dye extracts have a certain level of toxicity as well. Hmmm…

Though natural dyes can produce rich, complementary colors, many of the bright hues we see in stores are not available as natural dye colors. Even if consumers were to accept those limitations and switch to naturally dyed items only, we wouldn’t have enough land and water to produce all the dye material needed to color the human race’s wardrobes.

natural dyes

The concept of using agricultural waste as dye material makes good sense. Let’s see where that goes in the future. Ploughboy Organics, a blooming U.S. company, is developing a line of organic dyes and textiles using organic tobacco by-products, and claims the process will use less water and energy than conventional dyeing.

Noon Design Studio in Los Angeles specializes in dyeing natural fibers using natural ingredients and non-toxic mordants.

Saco River Dyehouse claims to be the only GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standard) certified yarn-dyeing factory in the U.S., and is now operating in Biddeford, Maine.

DIY. Safe, natural dyeing is definitely doable. If you do it yourself you can control which substances are used. I recommend you research the effects of the chemical compounds of each individual plant, mineral or animal used, as well as for the mordant recommended for each dye material.

4874571387_dab1f31bdb

 

Until truly sustainable dyeing systems are invented and adopted for mass production, I recommend backing the alternatives. Buy GOTS-certified organic textiles that were produced using low-impact dyes or none at all. Support colorgrown cotton, hemp, untreated wools, and recycled fabrics. Look for up-cycled items (clothes and accessories made from repurposed textiles and used clothes).

If items are certified organic to the GOTS standard, they will have the following qualities:

  • All chemical inputs (e.g., dyes, auxiliaries, and process chemicals) must be evaluated and meet basic requirements for toxicity and biodegradability/eliminability
  • Prohibition of critical inputs such as toxic heavy metals, formaldehyde, aromatic solvents, functional nano particles, and genetically modified organisms (GMO) and their enzymes
  • The use of synthetic sizing agents is restricted; knitting and weaving oils must not contain heavy metals
  • Bleaches must be based on oxygen (no chlorine bleaching)

Here at Lifekind, we only use colorgrown organic cotton, meaning the colors you see are the natural colors of the plant fibers that were used to make the product– NO DYES! More on colorgrown cotton to come…

If Textiles Could Talk: “Those colors are to dye for!”

Have you ever wondered about textile dyes and the effect they have on the environment? The purpose of this blog is to shed a neon light on the subject. Be forewarned: the beautiful colors in your closet may look different after reading… The textile dyeing and finishing industry has a very dirty past, and due to environmental concerns, is finally facing pressure to clean up its act. The industry uses huge amounts of chemicals and vast amounts of water (100-150 liters of water to process 1 kg of textile material) and is known for poisoning rivers by dumping mega amounts of toxic, untreated wastewater (effluent) directly into waterways. Pigments in India Azo dyes and pigments are used to color most textiles and leathers. They are dangerous to work with, giving off carcinogenic amines. The name Azo is derived from the Greek a (not) + zoe (to live). With a name like that, it’s no wonder these dyes have an adverse affect on water resources, soil fertility, and eco-system integrity. The industry also uses significant amounts of bleaches, acids, alkalis, salts, stabilizers, surfactants, fire retardants, softeners, starches, heavy metals, and an assortment of dyes (acid, basic, disperse, mordant, reactive, sulphur dye, pigment, and vat). Most of these chemicals are applied using water as a medium. With the price of water consumption and effluent disposal increasing, some companies are beginning to look at ways to reduce water usage and find viable ways to treat effluent, while many dye houses will continue to use up local water supplies and dump untreated toxic wastewater into streams and rivers until the cows come floating home. dumpnowaste Air-dyeing is a waterless dyeing system, which uses less energy and no auxiliary chemicals and is twice as fast. Nike and IKEA have invested in DyeCoo, a waterless dyeing company, and Adidas’ DryDye shirts are made using this system. Currently air-dyeing industrial machines only work on polyester and are very expensive, but carbon dioxide, the substance used, is inexpensive and is also re-used in the process, saving money and resources. While waterless dyeing may be more environmentally friendly, synthetic dyes are still used, however. Low-impact dyes have been classified as eco-friendly by the Oeko-Tex Standard 100 (an international certification process). These dyes generally do not contain toxic chemicals or mordants (used to fix dye to fiber), require less rinsing, and have a high absorption rate, saving energy and creating less wastewater than conventional methods. Fiber-reactive dyes are low-impact synthetic dyes that bond directly with fibers and don’t require mordants or use heavy metals or known toxic substances. They use lower temperatures and shorter cycles, saving water and energy, and are now available in brighter and richer colors as well as having excellent colorfast propertiesclothe Low-impact, fiber-reactive dyes are the dyes of choice in eco-fashion, and Oeko-Tex 100 certified dyes are used on organic textiles to qualify for the GOTS certification. The Global Organic Textile Standard is in place to cover all of the post-harvest production and processing of fibers. Stay tuned for If Textiles Could Talk part 2, about “natural” dyes.

Is There Baking Soda In My Mattress?

Fortunately knock on wood I have never experienced a stove fire. Yet I have always kept a box of baking soda in the cupboard above the stove, just in case. And while it’s true that baking soda has been used for many years to stave off fires, I was surprised to learn that it has also been used in mattresses. So when I asked the president of Lifekind, Walt Bader, his opinion on this subject, I got quite an explanation — and, I must say, a major education.bakingsoda

According to Walt:

“There are some mattress manufacturers that say baking soda is safe because we bake with it, brush our teeth with it, and, in the form of carbon dioxide, even put it in beverages. So how can it not be safe?

“Technically, we don’t breathe in carbon dioxide (CO2), we excrete it in our breath as a waste product. Re-breathing into a plastic bag can cause carbon dioxide poisoning. At higher levels you can experience panic, irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure, unconsciousness, or even death. And even though we’re talking about CO2, not baking soda, when baking soda is involved in a fire, it produces…guess what? Carbon dioxide. And it is absolutely possible to experience anoxia (total depletion in the level of oxygen) or asphyxiation from breathing CO2, which is created when harmless baking soda reacts to the heat of a fire.

“CO2 can kill you. In a fire environment, I am less concerned with CO2 reducing levels of oxygen than I am with the fact that it regulates breathing function because of changes in pH in the sleeper’s blood.

“This is why we use the more expensive option of wool as the only flame retardant in our mattresses.”

http://www.waltbader.com

A Peek Inside Mattresses

It’s no secret that we are big on purity. It’s also no secret that other mattress makers claim to be big on purity too, so when consumers are searching for the purest mattress they can find, it quickly becomes a matter of sleuthing out the truth.

From the outside, most mattresses look about the same. I totally understand why people will see a mattress that claims to be “natural” or “organic” for a fraction of what a Lifekind mattress costs, and they purchase it.

Naturally, comfort is a big part of why people purchase the mattresses they do. But if you’ve found Lifekind, you’re most likely also interested in what goes into making our mattresses — what you will be sleeping on for the next 20 years. Let’s dig a little deeper and look inside a few different mattresses.

 

This first picture (below) shows a conventional synthetic foam mattress, much like the ones you will find in mattress showrooms around the world. It looks pretty on the outside, nice and fluffy, and just begs you to climb into bed.

ConventionalMattressInterior

But once you look inside, you see something completely different.

The first layer is the cover material. Then there are several layers of conventional synthetic foam (notorious for offgassing, not to mention the petroleum it contains and the hardship it puts on the Earth to produce), bleached and highly processed cotton, more foam, and then a base layer that is made from cotton scraps.

 

This second picture is of a popular “organic” mattress brand that specializes in crib mattresses. Underneath the “food-grade” polyethylene mattress cover (made entirely from petrochemicals), you can see bleached cotton. The blue layer is a Tyvek-like material. Then cotton that is of an unknown grade (the specks you see in there are debris – stems from the cotton plant, along with other unknown detritus), then a plastic mesh layer. The cotton filling they use is most likely organic, but other than that, this mattress does not contain organic materials. Yet it is selling every day because the manufacturer touts the benefits of its “organic” mattresses, misleading consumers into believing that they are purchasing a pure, organic mattress without offering any clue about what is going on inside the mattress.  Naturally, most consumers won’t cut open a new mattress, so there is no way for them to know.

CompetitorMattressInterior

 

The third picture shows the inside of a GOTS-certified organic Lifekind mattress.  Looking at the layers from the top down, you can see our organic quilting, which includes only organic wool and organic cotton cover material. Sandwiched between layers of organic cotton canvas is high-quality, certified-organic cotton padding. No silica, Tyvek, or other synthetic, non-organic materials are included in its construction.  The innersprings used in the mattress are made of untreated virgin steel, wrapped in four layers of certified-organic cotton.

LifekindMattressInterior